Red and yellow cards will be shown to badly-behaved bosses this season

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Managers will be shown yellow and red cards this season, including in the Carabao Cup


Yellow and red cards will be shown to managers in four of the top five divisions of English football and in the Carabao Cup and Checkatrade Trophy this season, as part of a major shakeup to improve touchline behaviour.

The new rules, which work in a similar way to cards for players, will be used in the Championship and Leagues One and Two and will punish managers who are ‘guilty of irresponsible behaviour’.

They will also be implemented in the National League – where four yellow cards will result in a one-match ban – meaning a total of 96 clubs will need to adapt to the regulations.

Managers will be shown yellow and red cards this season, including in the Carabao Cup

Managers will be shown yellow and red cards this season, including in the Carabao Cup

The new rules won't be used in the Premier League, though, just the Championship and below

The new rules won't be used in the Premier League, though, just the Championship and below

The new rules won’t be used in the Premier League, though, just the Championship and below

Although the Premier League has not yet signed up to the global trial, top-flight managers may also experience it as it is believed it could come into force in the FA Cup.

Under the experiment, which has been designed by The International FA Board (IFAB), managers will be shown a yellow card for offences including throwing or kicking water bottles to show dissent and sarcastically clapping at the referee.

MARK CLATTENBURG

Referees already have the power to dismiss managers or warn them, but the trial of using red and yellow cards will improve transparency – everyone in the stadium or watching at home will know exactly what is happening.

Given the pressure of being a manager and the emotions it provokes during a game, I’m not sure this will act as a major deterrent. Players, for example, still protest to referees and put pressure on them, even though they can be cautioned for dissent.

But it will be very interesting to note the results – especially if managers start being nice and show more respect to referees all of a sudden!

Mark Clattenburg will be writing for the Daily Mail and MailOnline during the upcoming football season. 

Delaying the restart of play, deliberately entering the technical area of the opposing team and gesturing in an inflammatory way will be punished in the same way.

Managers who ‘excessively show the TV signal for a VAR review’ will also be shown a yellow card.

Under current rules, the referee only had the power to issue verbal warnings for initial offences and then could send managers to the stands only for the most serious offences.

This meant that ‘caution offences’, which will now result in a yellow card, risked going unpunished.

Two yellow cards will result in the manager being shown a red card and dismissed, and they could then face suspension from future matches, just as players are following cumulative yellow cards.

In the National League, for example, four yellow cards will result in a one match ban, eight will result in a two-match ban, 12 a three-match ban and more than 16 an FA misconduct charge. There is no cut-off date for this accumulation.

Straight red cards will be shown to managers for violent conduct, the use of insulting or abusive language or gestures, spitting at any person and stepping onto the pitch.

Four yellows will result in a one-match ban and the rules may be implemented in the FA Cup

Four yellows will result in a one-match ban and the rules may be implemented in the FA Cup

Four yellows will result in a one-match ban and the rules may be implemented in the FA Cup

Other ‘dismissal offences’ include entering the video operation room and deliberately throwing or kicking an object onto the pitch.

Decisions regarding how many cards are needed before a suspension, and the length of any suspension, will lie with the FA.

However, IFAB said that the experiment was designed to make it possible ‘for disciplinary action to be taken against persistent offenders’.

The EFL and the National League are understood to have applied to be part of the trial in the hope that it leads to significant improvement in managerial behaviour.

In 2015, the FA introduced a formal code of conduct for the technical areas to clamp down on verbal abuse from management staff.

The introduction of yellow and red cards is the next step in the effort to improve behaviour.

WHAT WARRANTS A CARD?

Managers will be shown yellow cards for:

– Throwing or kicking drinks bottles/other objects

– Gestures disrespecting officials, such as clapping

– Provocative, derisory or inflammatory gestures

– Gesturing for cards to be shown, or VAR to be used

– Repeatedly leaving the technical area around the dug-out

– Entering the opponents’ technical area

– Time-wasting

Managers will be shown red cards for:

– Receiving a second yellow card

– Violent conduct

– Physical or aggressive behaviour

– Spitting

– Entering the field to confront officials

– Interfering with play on the pitch

– Deliberately throwing or kicking objects on to the pitch

– Stopping the opposition restarting play

– Using unauthorised electronic equipment

It is also hoped that it will lead to a better experience for referees, who can now show a card from a distance rather than risk getting into a confrontation with a manager on the touchline.

The rules are also intended to increase transparency for fans, as seeing a card being issued is considered easier to understand than seeing a verbal exchange between a referee and a manager.

Australia’s A and W Leagues became the first top-tier leagues in the world to take part in IFAB’s trial last season, and the trial has now been extended to a number of other Australian leagues due to the positive feedback.

FIFA also used it in the under-17 World Cup in India last year and Sportsmail understands CONCACAF plan to use it in some of their competitions.

A number of other countries are also said to have applied to IFAB to be included in the trial. 

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