Archaeologists OPEN mystery 9-foot black sarcophagus in Egypt, despite repeated warnings of a CURSE

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A mysterious ten foot (three metre) long black sarcophagus has been opened in Egypt, despite repeated warnings of a curse placed on the burial chamber (pictured)


A mysterious ten foot (three-metre) long black sarcophagus has been opened in Alexandria, found on the northern coast of Egypt and founded by the legendary leader of the same name.

The 6.5ft (two metre) high coffin was first discovered earlier this month and unearthed in recent days.

The 30-ton (27,000 kg) tomb was found buried 16ft (five metres) beneath the ground of the city.

Egyptologists pried open the black granite sarcophagus earlier today to reveal three decomposed bodies.

The stone coffin was also filled with sewage water, which is believed to have increased the rate of decomposition.

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A mysterious ten foot (three metre) long black sarcophagus has been opened in Egypt, despite repeated warnings of a curse placed on the burial chamber (pictured)

A mysterious ten foot (three metre) long black sarcophagus has been opened in Egypt, despite repeated warnings of a curse placed on the burial chamber (pictured)

The move was confirmed by Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt.

‘The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse, said Mr Waziri.

None of the three mummies belong to a Ptolemaic or Roman royal family, as had previously been suggested, according to reports in Egypt Today

This conclusion is based on the coffins bearing no inscriptions or a cartouche displaying the occupant’s names

The lack of silver or gold metallic masks, statues, amulets or inscriptions also suggests they were not of high status.

The 6.5ft (two metre) high coffin was unearthed in Alexandria, which is built on the city founded by the legendary leader of the same name. Inside were the remains of three 

The 6.5ft (two metre) high coffin was unearthed in Alexandria, which is built on the city founded by the legendary leader of the same name. Inside were the remains of three 

The 6.5ft (two metre) high coffin was unearthed in Alexandria, which is built on the city founded by the legendary leader of the same name. Inside were the remains of three 

The 30-ton (27,000 kg) tomb was found buried 16ft (five metres) beneath the ground of the city. Egyptologists pried open the black granite sarcophagus earlier today to reveal three decomposed bodies

The 30-ton (27,000 kg) tomb was found buried 16ft (five metres) beneath the ground of the city. Egyptologists pried open the black granite sarcophagus earlier today to reveal three decomposed bodies

The 30-ton (27,000 kg) tomb was found buried 16ft (five metres) beneath the ground of the city. Egyptologists pried open the black granite sarcophagus earlier today to reveal three decomposed bodies

The coffin bears no inscriptions or a cartouche displaying the occupants' names. The lack of silver or gold metallic masks, statues, amulets or inscriptions also suggests they were not of high status. Pictured -  workers preparing to open the black granite sarcophagus

The coffin bears no inscriptions or a cartouche displaying the occupants' names. The lack of silver or gold metallic masks, statues, amulets or inscriptions also suggests they were not of high status. Pictured -  workers preparing to open the black granite sarcophagus

The coffin bears no inscriptions or a cartouche displaying the occupants’ names. The lack of silver or gold metallic masks, statues, amulets or inscriptions also suggests they were not of high status. Pictured – workers preparing to open the black granite sarcophagus

Mr Waziri said in a press statement that one of the skulls showed signs of multiple fractures. 

He suggested that it had been hit by a sharp instrument and that it belonged to a soldier.

He also said that the other two skulls were intact and male, with further studies expected to reveal their ages and appearances

‘Preliminary examination suggests the skeletons belong to three army officers, one of them his skull shows an injury of an arrow,’ Shaban Abd Monem, a specialist in mummies at the Ministry of Antiquities, told Luxor Times.

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity

The move was confirmed by Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt. 'The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse, said Mr Waziri 

The move was confirmed by Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt. 'The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse, said Mr Waziri 

The move was confirmed by Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt. ‘The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse, said Mr Waziri 

The three mummies will now be moved to the Alexandria National Museum, while the coffin will be transferred to a military museum.

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity.

Egyptologists at the time determined the tomb belonged to a nobleman as opposed to a king, The Daily Telegraph reported. 

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity

The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity

The three mummies will now be moved to the Alexandria National Museum, while the coffin will be transferred to a military museum

The three mummies will now be moved to the Alexandria National Museum, while the coffin will be transferred to a military museum

 The sarcophagus was uncovered inside an ancient tomb earlier this month, which also contained a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity. The three mummies will now be moved to the Alexandria National Museum, while the coffin will be transferred to a military museum

The stone coffin was also filled with sewage water, which is believed to have increased the rate of decomposition. Researchers opened it 20 days after discovering it beneath the city

The stone coffin was also filled with sewage water, which is believed to have increased the rate of decomposition. Researchers opened it 20 days after discovering it beneath the city

The stone coffin was also filled with sewage water, which is believed to have increased the rate of decomposition. Researchers opened it 20 days after discovering it beneath the city

Some historians believe Alexander’s remains could one day be discovered on top of the modern city, which is built on the ancient settlement he established. 

Antiques ministry officials said at the time that the sarcophagus had been sealed for more than 2,000 years. 

An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin.

Questions as to the identity of the person inside arose due to the worn bust and the absence of any written inscriptions.

Some said it belonged to a rich or noble man who lived between 323BC and 30BC. This was the time Rome seized Egypt and after the death of Cleopatra.

Archaeologists at the time said it was unlikely to belong to Alexander the Great as the tomb was not grand enough and this bust leaves little in the way of clues due to erosion

Archaeologists at the time said it was unlikely to belong to Alexander the Great as the tomb was not grand enough and this bust leaves little in the way of clues due to erosion

Archaeologists at the time said it was unlikely to belong to Alexander the Great as the tomb was not grand enough and this bust leaves little in the way of clues due to erosion

An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin

An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin

Some historians believe Alexander’s remains could one day be discovered on top of the modern city, which is built on the ancient settlement he established

One of the skulls appears to have been hit by a sharp instrument, and experts suspect it belonged to a soldier. They also said that the other two skulls were intact and male, with further studies expected to reveal their ages and appearances

One of the skulls appears to have been hit by a sharp instrument, and experts suspect it belonged to a soldier. They also said that the other two skulls were intact and male, with further studies expected to reveal their ages and appearances

One of the skulls appears to have been hit by a sharp instrument, and experts suspect it belonged to a soldier. They also said that the other two skulls were intact and male, with further studies expected to reveal their ages and appearances

The tomb was said to be ‘too small’ for a king like Alexander as bigger ones have been found to contain Roman nobles.

When news it would be opened surfaced online, American author Catherynne Valente joked: ‘If the movies have taught me anything, guys, don’t open that. Just don’t. Leave it alone.’ 

Elsewhere in Egypt, archaeologists have also discovered an ancient pottery manufacturing workshop dating to more than 4,000 years ago.

The Antiquities Ministry says the workshop is situated close to the Nile River in Aswan province in southern Egypt. 

It says the workshop, the oldest pottery workshop in the Old Kingdom, belongs to the 4th Dynasty, spanning 2613 to 2494BC

 Antiques ministry officials said at the time it was discovered that the sarcophagus had been sealed for more than 2,000 years. An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin

 Antiques ministry officials said at the time it was discovered that the sarcophagus had been sealed for more than 2,000 years. An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin

 Antiques ministry officials said at the time it was discovered that the sarcophagus had been sealed for more than 2,000 years. An undisturbed layer of mortar sat between its lid and the body of the coffin

Questions as to the identity of the person inside arose due to the worn bust and the absence of any written inscriptions. Some said it belonged to a rich or noble man who lived between 323BC and 30BC. This was the time Rome seized Egypt and after the death of Cleopatra 

Questions as to the identity of the person inside arose due to the worn bust and the absence of any written inscriptions. Some said it belonged to a rich or noble man who lived between 323BC and 30BC. This was the time Rome seized Egypt and after the death of Cleopatra 

Questions as to the identity of the person inside arose due to the worn bust and the absence of any written inscriptions. Some said it belonged to a rich or noble man who lived between 323BC and 30BC. This was the time Rome seized Egypt and after the death of Cleopatra 

The Old Kingdom is also known as the age when pyramid-building flourished.

Inside the workshop, archaeologists found an ancient pottery manufacturing wheel made of a limestone turntable and a hollow base.

Mostafa Waziri added that the discovery was ‘rare’ and reveals more about the development of pottery manufacturing and the daily lives of ancient Egyptians during that time in history.

The find follows another recent discovery in Egypt, in which archaeologists uncovered an ancient mummification workshop dating back more than 2,500 years.

Specialist stumbled across the find near Egypt’s famed pyramids at an ancient necropolis south of Cairo.

This undated photos provide by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows a 4000-year old pottery manufacturing workshop that was recently discovered close to the Nile River in Aswan province, southern Egypt

This undated photos provide by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows a 4000-year old pottery manufacturing workshop that was recently discovered close to the Nile River in Aswan province, southern Egypt

This undated photos provide by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, shows a 4000-year old pottery manufacturing workshop that was recently discovered close to the Nile River in Aswan province, southern Egypt

The discovery included a mummification workshop and a shaft, which was used as a communal burial place, located at the Saqqara necropolis of Memphis – the first capital of ancient Egypt.

Memphis, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and its vast necropolis are home to a wide range of temples and tombs as well as the three renowned Giza pyramids.

The latest find, announced at a press conference Saturday, belongs to the Saite-Persian Period, from 664-404 B.C.

The site, which lies south of the Unas pyramid, was last excavated more than 100 years ago, in 1900. 

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